Archive for Vegan

Vegan Jerky

One of the common questions that vegans and vegetarians get a lot of the time is “where do you get your protein?”

It’s actually pretty surprising how easy it is to get plant-based sources of protein in your diet. Not all protein needs to be a big steak!

vegan jerky

For me, personally, peanut butter is something I eat pretty much every day, and cheese is a pretty big staple for me. I also eat quite a few legumes: beans, chickpeas and lentils (my freezer is still full of chickpeas from that time I wrote an Aquafaba cookbook). You might be surprised to learn quinoa is also packed with protein.

And then there’s tofu. Look–I’ve been pretty honest with you guys about how I feel about tofu. It’s not my favorite. I have a hard time infusing any flavor into it, no matter what I do to it. But I do still eat it some.

Tempeh is kind of like tofu’s cousin. Regular tofu is made from soybeans, but tempeh is made from fermented soy. Fermenting makes it easier to digest, if you have a tough time eating beans. Additionally, just one cup has 30 grams of protein! Not bad at all…

I recently ran into a new, local tempeh manufacturer here in Vancouver called Tempea. I discovered them at The Wellness Show, but you can run into them at Farmer’s Markets all over the Lower Mainland. I love to support local business, so the Tempea Tempeh is the basis of this recipe.

Now, let’s talk Jerky for a sec. Once thought to be the food of late-night 7-11 runs and hunters, the Paleo/Primal movement has caused a resurgence in jerky’s cool factor. When made with meat, jerky is basically cured and dried to the point where it won’t spoil. It becomes lighter, and very portable and packable. Full of protein, it makes a great snack to take a on hike or a longer trip where you won’t have access to purchase food. For the rest of us, it can make a great post-workout snack.

While traditional jerky is usually made with meat, you can make vegan jerky using tofu. This vegan, however, is made with tempeh. It’s pretty simple to do. You marinade the tempeh (cut in thin slices) overnight, then dehydrate them the next day. I used my dehydrator for this, but you could just as easily do it in your oven at very low temp.

Et voila! A light, portable, tasty, full-of-protein snack!

Tempeh Jerky

Vegan Jerky

Ingredients:

  • Tempeh (I used Tempea)
  • 2 tbsp soy sauce or wheat-free tamari
  • 1 tbsp apple cider vinegar
  • 6 drops liquid smoke
  • a couple dashes of hot sauce
  • 2 tbsp your favorite BBQ sauce
  • 2 tbsp maple syrup
  • 1/2 tsp granulated garlic
  • 1/2 tsp sesame oil

Method:

  1. Slice the tempeh thin and set aside.
  2. In a mason jar, combine all the marinade ingredients and shake well. Add the tempeh and make sure it is all well-coated in the marinade. You can add some water if you like to give it more volume. Place in the fridge overnight.
  3. The next day, remove the tempeh from the marinade and dry on paper towels.
  4. Place in a single layer in your dehydrator, and allow to dehydrate for about 2-2 1/2 hours on 225 degrees. If you don’t have a dehydrator, place in a single layer on a parchment-lined baking sheet. Bake at 200 degrees, for about 2-2 1/2 hours. Store in an air-tight container.

 

 

 

 

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Coconut Key Lime Pie {Vegan}

Recipe number 2 this week on the theme of coconut-lime!

This is a variation of the lemon meringue pie that I wrote for my cookbook, Aquafabulous! I just made it up, though, so it didn’t actually make it into the cookbook… whoops!

Coconut Key Lime Pie Vegan

This is really, really tasty.

Normally lemon curd is thickened with egg yolks, and then you use the whites (which you have separated out) to whip to make the meringue. This recipe is vegan, so no eggs or butter are used, obviously. Aquafaba is used for the meringue, of course, but the curd still needs to be thickened in some way. Here, I used cornstarch.

The coconut milk also helps to give it a thick, creamy texture and a nice, fatty mouthfeel.

Torch the meringue on this mutha, and you have a show-stopping dessert. Even better, torch it at the table to generate some excitement and oohs and ahhs.

Oh–FYI–even thought I’m calling this “key lime pie,” I just used regular limes. You can use either, based on what is available to you.

Vegan Coconut Key Lime Pie

Coconut Key Lime Pie {Vegan}

Ingredients

  • 1 store-bought vegan pie crust or home-made
  • 1 400 ml can of coconut milk
  • 2 tbsp cornstarch
  • 3/4 cup sugar
  • 1/2 tsp salt
  • Zest of 2 limes
  • 3/4 cup lime juice (freshly squeezed or bottled if you’re lazy)
  • 1/2 cup vegan butter (or you could try coconut oil)
  • 1/3 cup aquafaba
  • 1/4 cup sugar
  • 1/4 tsp cream of tartar

Method

  1. Dock your pie crust with a fork and pre-bake it in a 350 degree oven for about 10 minutes, or until it’s golden. Set aside to cool.
  2. In a medium, heavy-bottomed saucepan, place the coconut milk and the cornstarch. Whisk well to combine. Turn the heat on to about medium, and bring up to the boil, allowing the milk to thicken. Add the sugar, salt, lime zest, lime juice, and vegan butter, and whisk well to combine. Bring up to the boil again, allowing it to bubble and thicken. NOTE: if the colour is too pale, you could add a couple drops of green food colouring. This won’t affect the taste, just the esthetic look of the pie.
  3. Pour the hot curd into the prepared pie crust, and let set in the fridge overnight (or at least for a few hours).
  4. To make the meringue, place the aquafaba, sugar and cream of tartar in the bowl of your stand mixer (alternatively, you can do this with a hand mixer, it just means you have to stand there and whip it for 10 minutes). Whip for 2 minutes on the lowest setting to combine, then turn up to medium for 2 minutes, and finally to high for about another 4-6 minutes, until the meringue is light and fluffy, and holds a peak.
  5. Spread the meringue on top of the pie, and torch to brown. Serve immediately.
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