Tag Archive for vegan food

Copycat Red Lobster Biscuits {Vegan}

My teenager is obsessed with American fast food.

I get it. I remember being a teenager growing up in a tiny town in Newfoundland where we had zero Starbucks, and loving going to the Mainland where our first stop was always… Starbucks. Seems a lot less exotic now, and of course fast food isn’t really my jam. When we travel to the States, I’m all about stocking up at Trader Joe’s, and finding all the vegan donut shops.

Copycat Red Lobster Biscuits Vegan

Travelling with my teenager, though… well, I’m a pretty indulgent mom. When we were recently in Seattle for spring break, we went to a few places at his request; specifically Red Lobster and The Cheesecake Factory. The Cheesecake Factory has a massive menu, so vegetarian options were there, but Red Lobster? Less so.

Having said that, it was our first time, and we were there for the experience. Much like The Olive Garden (they are actually owned by the same parent company), dinner at Red Lobster is an all-inclusive event. Your entree comes with soup or salad, and instead of breadsticks (like the Olive Garden), it comes with biscuits. Fluffy, warm, heavenly biscuits.

So, of course, once I had them, I made it my mission to veganize them. Turns out, it wasn’t that challenging to do.

To make these authentically, you need Old Bay seasoning, which is a seasoning mix used a lot in the South. If you can’t find it where you are, you can mix up a batch of your own.

The other thing that makes these biscuits out of this world is the warm, seasoned butter mixture you brush on them when they come out of the oven. So good.

Serve them hot for best results.

Vegan Cheddar Bay Biscuits

Copycat Red Lobster Biscuits {Vegan}

Ingredients:

  • 2 cups AP flour
  • 1 tbsp sugar
  • 1 tbsp baking powder
  • 2 tsp old bay seasoning
  • 1/2 tsp salt
  • 1 tbsp lemon juice
  • 1 cup neutral non-dairy milk (not flavoured)
  • 1/2 cup vegan butter or vegetable shortening (or a combo of both)
  • 1/2 cup shredded vegan cheddar cheese

For the topping:

  • 3 tbsp melted vegan butter
  • 1 tsp Old Bay seasoning
  • 1/2 tsp dried parsley
  • 1/2 tsp salt

Method:

  • In a small bowl, place the non-dairy milk and add the lemon juice to it. Stir and let stand for 5 minutes.
  • In a large bowl, combine the dry ingredients.
  • Add the cheese shreds and toss with the dry ingredients to combine.
  • Break the vegan butter up into small pieces and throw them into the dry ingredients. Mush everything together until it becomes a pea-like. crumby consistency.
  • Finally, add the milk and mix together just until it comes together. It’ll be sticky, but that’s okay.
  • Drop by 1/4 cup fulls onto a greased cookie sheet, and bake at 450 degrees for about 10-12 minutes, until golden on top.
  • Remove from oven and brush all over with the melted butter topping. Serve hot.

 

What Kinds of Sugars Work with Aquafaba Meringue?

A few months back, while I was working on my cookbook, I spent a day playing with different kinds of sugars.

There are lots of folks out there (especially in the vegan community) that are trying to avoid sugar, or at least cut down on it.

An additional note to make is that most people assume that granulated sugar (which is what I primarily use to make Aquafaba meringue) is vegan. I mean, why wouldn’t you?

Different Sugars and Aquafaba

But it turns out that some sugar is processed by filtering it through bone char, which would render it non-vegan for most, given that the sugar has come into contact with an animal product (despite the fact that it contains no animal products). If you live here in BC, our main supplier of sugar is Roger’s, and their sugar is indeed filtered through bone char.

Again, it all just depends on whether or not you are vegan–there are certainly lots of people who may use aquafaba for other reasons.

But let’s go with this–let’s say you are vegan and you’re trying to avoid granulated sugar–which, let’s face it, is the worst kind for you, anyway.

You have lots of options! Basically any sugar that is unrefined, organic or raw, will not be filtered through bone char (here’s a list of vegan sugars). BUT if you’re making aquafaba meringue, will these sugars work?

Sugar is important to the process. When you’re making a meringue, sugar helps to stabilize the aquafaba, and of course, if you’re adding it to desserts, it adds sweetness. I’ve made aquafaba meringue without sugar (just some stabilizer like cream of tartar) and it worked fine for non-sweet recipes, but most of the time, I’m using it in sweeter interpretations, so I do add sugar.

I was curious to see what sugars worked best with aquafaba, so I did a little experiment.

I tried making meringue with aquafaba and 6 different kinds of sugars.

For these, I used the ratio:

  • 3 tbsp aquafaba
  • 1 tbsp sugar
  • 1/4 tsp cream of tartar

I then fired all of that in my KitchenAid stand mixer and let it go for about 6-10 minutes.

Organic: Organic sugar is less processed than white sugar. First off, it comes from organic sugarcane, and secondly, there are no chemical processes done to the sugarcane. So it’s a much purer result.

Coconut sugar: Coconut sugar has a lower GI (about 30-35) than regular sugar, which is why it’s becoming so popular right now. I actually like this one quite a bit.

Turbinado: this is “Sugar in the Raw” or raw sugar. It’s a coarser grain and a darker colour.

Brown Sugar: So, while it might seem less refined than white sugar (and to some degree it is), brown sugar is mostly white sugar with molasses added back in for flavor and colour. So, again, ideally buy the organic version of this to ensure it’s vegan, if that’s your deal.

Xylitol: made from the bark of birch trees (I know, sounds weird, right?) Xylitol is as sweet as sugar, so you can use it cup-for-cup, but it’s natural, and doesn’t have an aftertaste like stevia does. It’s also basically zero on the GI scale, so it’s kind of like sugar free sugar.

Monkfruit: It’s made from a tropical melon, and it’s pretty sweet, though it has a GI of zero. I’ve been using it for about a year. You have to be careful not to use too much. I put some in my coffee the other day and couldn’t drink it. Monkfruit was the only sweetener that did not work at all with the Aquafaba.

Conclusion: they all worked with aquafaba to some degree. Some formed better peaks than others. Surprisingly, Xylitol worked really well. The browner sugars changed the colour of the meringue, so if that’s an issue for you, stick to to organic white sugar.

 

Save

Save

Save

« Older Entries