Archive for Special Occaisons

Vegan Food at the Vancouver Christmas Market

Well, guys, it’s that time of the year again. I’m not quite sure where 2018 went, but what I do know is, I ate some great food this year.

The Vancouver Christmas Market has become an annual tradition here in our fair city. Every year, they build a magical village at Jack Poole Plaza (surrounding the Olympic torch) in Coal Harbour. Vancouver Christmas Market

Christmas Markets are a staple in Europe, and this one is done in a German tradition. There are tons of activities for the kids, an old-fashioned carousel, live music, and of course German beer and traditional gluhwein, warm wine mulled with spices.

There are tons of crafty-type booths where you can buy Christmas gifts, but for me, the highlight of the Christmas market is the food. I mean, duh, right??

While many people equate German food with meat-oriented foods like schnitzel and bratwurst, the reality is that Germany has a huge vegan population. And this year, there are more vegan food choices than ever at the Vancouver Christmas market.

There are two new vegan options this year, so I’ll start with those first.

Organic Villa Veggie Dog

Organic Villa Vegan Haus – This is where you’re going to find some savoury items. They serve a quinoa and bean burger, a roasted veggie wrap, a veggie dog, and dosas. Dosas, guys!! Yeah, yeah, I know they’re not German, but they are delicious. I tried the veggie dog from here. It’s made with an Yves veggie dog, but the spicy, cheesy sauce and toppings are what make it delicious.

Mr. Hotcakes

Mr. Hotcakes: Dessert in the form of a filled pancake! Mr. Hotcakes makes these vegan pancakes that are filled in the middle with a sweet brown sugar syrup. Then they put them on the grill and you get a toasty pancake with a gooey, warm, sweet centre. So good!

Das Gulasch Haus vegan stew

Das Gulasch Haus: These guys do a hearty stew filled with potatoes and other veggies, served in a bread bowl. So comforting and warm.

Bavarian Burger: Despite the name, these guys sell a vegan split pea soup.

Das Kartoffelhaus Hurricane Potatoes: yup, those giant potatoes on a stick are vegan. Vegan toppings include cinnamon sugar, salt & vinegar, and ketchup.

Vegan Churros

Traditional Spanish Churros: also really, really not German, but who cares?? I have to have these every time I go to the market. Because donuts, guys. Donuts.

Taste the Wild: These guys do a hot vegetable and mushroom broth that’s made from locally-sourced mushrooms from right here in British Columbia.

Das Stollen Haus: They have a whole selection of vegan cookies and baked goods for yourself, or to gift.

You’ll also find vegan chocolate and vegan candy options as well.

Gluhwein

The Vancouver Christmas Market is open now until Christmas Eve at Jack Poole Plaza. Admission is $12 for adults ($10 if you buy your tickets online), and food items will run you anywhere from $5-$15.

Roasted Squash Hummus with Turmeric {Vegan}

it’s Thanksgiving in Canada.

Despite the fact that most of my family lives right here in the Lower Mainland, we’re all busy with our lives and we don’t spend tons of time together. We do usually get together for Thanksgiving, though. It’s an easy, laid-back affair with way too much food, and containers of leftovers coming home.

I usually make a dessert at the request of the famjam, but this year, I want to introduce you to something a bit different.

Roasted squash hummus with turmeric

Now, as you know, chickpeas are my jam. Okay, so chickpea water, technically, is my jam, but you gotta do something with all those cans of chickpeas you’re opening for the aquafaba, so we eat a lot of hummus.

In my cookbook, I have no less than 6 different kinds of hummus. I thought, in fact, that I had discovered all the hummus combinations, but friends, let me tell you, I have not.

Last week, I attended VanFoodster’s very first Vegetarian Tasting Plates. I have written a whole post about what I discovered on that food tour, but one of the places we visited was called Saj & Co (on Davie) and there, we were served a roasted butternut squash hummus! It was fantastic–brightened with a touch of turmeric.

So of course I came home and started roasting squash to make it.

It’s an incredibly pretty dish, and the squash adds a creaminess and a sweetness that I think would make it an incredible appetizer for your Thanksgiving table.

I served mine with super-simple-to-make za’atar crackers.

Squash Hummus

Roasted Squash Hummus

  • 1 can chickpeas, drained, reserve the aquafaba
  • 1 1/2 cups cubed roasted squash (I actually used a kobucha, but I think anything will do, butternut, acorn, etc)
  • 1/4 cup tahini
  • 1-2 cloves garlic, minced
  • juice of 1 lemon
  • 1/4 cup water
  • 1/4 cup aquafaba
  • salt & pepper
  • 1 tsp cumin
  • 1 tsp turmeric
  • optional garnishes: pepitas, balsamic reduction, olive oil, fresh herbs, smoked paprika, za’atar.

Method

  1. Cut the squash in half and dig out the seeds with a spoon. Chop into larger chunks, then drizzle all over with olive oil, and salt and pepper. Place on a baking sheet and roast in a 400 degree oven until soft, about 30 minutes (depending on the size of the squash).
  2. Remove from the oven and allow to cool enough so you can work with it. Remove the skins, and chop into chunks.
  3. In your blender or food processor, place all the ingredients, except for the water.
  4. Blend well until the mixture is smooth, stopping to scrape down the sides.
  5. With the blender running, slowly drizzle the water into the top of the blender or food processor. If the hummus is still too thick, add a bit more water, or olive oil if you like until it gets to the right creamy consistency.
  6. To make the crackers: take two large tortillas and brush them with a little oil. Sprinkle with za’atar and then cut into strips. Place in a single layer on a baking sheet and bake in a 300 degree oven until crisp and a little brown around the edges.
  7. To serve: ladle the hummus onto the centre of a plate, and scatter the crackers around. garnish with a drizzle of olive oil, a sprinkle of coarse salt, and a few dots of balsamic reduction.
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