Archive for Recipes: Savory

Vegan Jerky

One of the common questions that vegans and vegetarians get a lot of the time is “where do you get your protein?”

It’s actually pretty surprising how easy it is to get plant-based sources of protein in your diet. Not all protein needs to be a big steak!

vegan jerky

For me, personally, peanut butter is something I eat pretty much every day, and cheese is a pretty big staple for me. I also eat quite a few legumes: beans, chickpeas and lentils (my freezer is still full of chickpeas from that time I wrote an Aquafaba cookbook). You might be surprised to learn quinoa is also packed with protein.

And then there’s tofu. Look–I’ve been pretty honest with you guys about how I feel about tofu. It’s not my favorite. I have a hard time infusing any flavor into it, no matter what I do to it. But I do still eat it some.

Tempeh is kind of like tofu’s cousin. Regular tofu is made from soybeans, but tempeh is made from fermented soy. Fermenting makes it easier to digest, if you have a tough time eating beans. Additionally, just one cup has 30 grams of protein! Not bad at all…

I recently ran into a new, local tempeh manufacturer here in Vancouver called Tempea. I discovered them at The Wellness Show, but you can run into them at Farmer’s Markets all over the Lower Mainland. I love to support local business, so the Tempea Tempeh is the basis of this recipe.

Now, let’s talk Jerky for a sec. Once thought to be the food of late-night 7-11 runs and hunters, the Paleo/Primal movement has caused a resurgence in jerky’s cool factor. When made with meat, jerky is basically cured and dried to the point where it won’t spoil. It becomes lighter, and very portable and packable. Full of protein, it makes a great snack to take a on hike or a longer trip where you won’t have access to purchase food. For the rest of us, it can make a great post-workout snack.

While traditional jerky is usually made with meat, you can make vegan jerky using tofu. This vegan, however, is made with tempeh. It’s pretty simple to do. You marinade the tempeh (cut in thin slices) overnight, then dehydrate them the next day. I used my dehydrator for this, but you could just as easily do it in your oven at very low temp.

Et voila! A light, portable, tasty, full-of-protein snack!

Tempeh Jerky

Vegan Jerky

Ingredients:

  • Tempeh (I used Tempea)
  • 2 tbsp soy sauce or wheat-free tamari
  • 1 tbsp apple cider vinegar
  • 6 drops liquid smoke
  • a couple dashes of hot sauce
  • 2 tbsp your favorite BBQ sauce
  • 2 tbsp maple syrup
  • 1/2 tsp granulated garlic
  • 1/2 tsp sesame oil

Method:

  1. Slice the tempeh thin and set aside.
  2. In a mason jar, combine all the marinade ingredients and shake well. Add the tempeh and make sure it is all well-coated in the marinade. You can add some water if you like to give it more volume. Place in the fridge overnight.
  3. The next day, remove the tempeh from the marinade and dry on paper towels.
  4. Place in a single layer in your dehydrator, and allow to dehydrate for about 2-2 1/2 hours on 225 degrees. If you don’t have a dehydrator, place in a single layer on a parchment-lined baking sheet. Bake at 200 degrees, for about 2-2 1/2 hours. Store in an air-tight container.

 

 

 

 

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Lazy Sourdough Bread (Vegan)

I have a new love in my life. Let me introduce you:

Cocotte from Staub

Gorgeous, right???

I tend to not be super materialistic; most of my furniture is from Ikea, I don’t own a lot of clothes, and I drive a 10-year-old Kia.

But in the kitchen, things are different. I have a serious gadget addiction, and boy, do I love my knives.

I have always longed for a piece of enameled French cookware to call my own, and now I have one. This is the Cocotte from Staub.

I’ve wanted one of these heirloom pieces since forever, but you may not be aware of just how versatile they are. Sure, you can cook stuff in them on top of the stove, like soups and stews and risottos. But they also go into the oven, as well, making the transition from browning something on the stovetop and then finishing it off in the oven seamless.

Beyond that, though, you can also make bread in them. Like, really, really good bread.

Sourdough bread in a dutch oven

Something, again, I’ve been wanting to make for ages, but never had the ability. Now I do.

I love this recipe for Lazy Sourdough Bread because it’s so perfect in its simplicity. You literally need 4 ingredients, and there’s no kneading.

It does take some time, though, so make sure you plan ahead.

Sourdough starter

I got my sourdough starter from a friend. I have tried making my own starter in the past, and it was a giant failure. Maybe you’ll be more successful? Otherwise, there are other options.  You can sub out the sourdough for a little actual yeast; about 1 tsp should do it. Alternatively, Homestead Junction sells it, or you can take a course there to learn how to make your own.

I prefer sourdough to regular yeast, as the fermented nature of sourdough is more natural, and better for me.

Really, this results in the most amazing, crusty, chewy delicious loaf of bread. I will be making these for everyone I know. Who wants to be my friend?? 😉

lazy sourdough bread vegan

Lazy Sourdough Bread (Vegan)

(adapted from Breadtopia)

Ingredients

  • 3 ½ cups flour (I used a mix of 1.5 cups whole wheat & 2 cups AP)
  • 1 ½ tsp salt
  • 1 ½ cups water (room temp)
  • ¼ cup sourdough starter

Method

  1. Mix together the flour and the salt in a large bowl.
  2. Add the sourdough to the water and mix well (here’s a hint: your sourdough is good if it mostly floats on the top). If you are using yeast and not sourdough, sprinkle it overtop of the water and allow it to sit for about 5 minutes to “bloom.”
  3. Make a well in the dry ingredients, and pour the water/yeast mixture into it.
  4. Begin to mix the bread together, first with a spoon, but you’ll probably need to get in there with your hands to really mix it together until all the flour is incorporated.
  5. Cover with plastic wrap and a tea towel, and allow to sit in a warm spot overnight.
  6. The next morning, remove from the bowl. It should have grown significantly overnight, if not doubled in size. Trace the shape of the lid of your dutch oven on a piece of parchment, and cut that circle out. Place the parchment on a cutting board. Form the dough into a nice circle loaf (you may need to flour your hands and your work surface if the dough is sticky) and place it on the parchment. Cover with a damp tea towel and allow to sit in a warm place to rise for 45 minutes.
  7. After 45 minutes, place your dutch oven in the oven, and turn the temperature on to 450 degrees. Allow the oven to preheat for 45 minutes.
  8. Once the oven and dutch oven are hot, carefully pull the loaf up and drop it into your pot. Cover and allow to bake for 30 minutes.
  9. Remove lid, turn down the heat to 400 degrees, and bake an additional 15 minutes. Remove from oven, allow to cool and enjoy (preferably still warm, with olive oil or vegan butter).

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