Archive for Recipes: Savory

Quinoa, Black Bean, Butternut Chili

I tend to cook with the seasons. That means I like to eat ingredients when they are seasonally available; which means fresh greens and fruit in the summer, heartier winter vegetables in the winter.

a, Black Bean, Butternut Chili

It’s been a long, hot summer here in Vancouver, with very little rain. It’s only just over the last few days that we’ve started to feel a change in the weather, and have been happy to see some badly-needed rain.

One of the things I love most about living here is our beautiful, warm falls. You can pretty much count on there being beautiful weather well into October.

So while Starbucks may be already pimping out the PSL, I’m going to try to enjoy the last bit of summer for a while.

However, I am turning to warmer recipes these days, now that it’s cooled down enough for me to turn on my oven. I’m loving my French Enamel cookware (I am lucky enough to now own TWO Staub Cocottes), which are busy these days making up pots of beans and soups and stews.

Even before I was a vegetarian, I made my chili without meat. I just don’t think it needs it, simply put. Chili, made with beans, especially, is so meaty and full of protein already. It really fills you up.

The spin on this one includes one of my favorite fall ingredients: butternut squash. It also includes and extra dose of protein in the form of quinoa.

It’s a little sweet, a little spicy, very warming and oh-so-filling. You can make this in your French Enamelware, or in your slow cooker.

Vegan Chili

Quinoa, Black Bean, Butternut Chili

 

Ingredients:

  • 1 medium onion
  • 5 cloves garlic
  • 1 small can tomato paste
  • 1 chipotle pepper in adobo sauce, finely chopped
  • 2 tsp chili powder
  • 1 tsp cumin
  • 1 tsp coriander
  • 1 tsp smoked paprika
  • 1 tsp cinnamon
  • salt and pepper to taste
  • 4 c vegetable stock
  • 1 can black beans, drained
  • 1 smallish butternut squash
  • 1 large (14-oz) can of diced tomatoes
  • 1 c uncooked quinoa
  • 1/4 c chopped cilantro

Method:

  1. Heat your dutch oven over medium heat, and add a couple tablespoons of oil. Dice up the onion and add it to the pot. Season and stir well. Allow onions to sweat out for 5-10 minutes, until soft.
  2. While the onions are cooking, cut the butternut squash in half, and peel. Scoop out the seeds, then cut into 1″ dice.
  3. Finely dice the garlic and add it, stirring, just until fragrant. Now add all the spices and stir well so that they coat the onions and garlic.
  4. Now add the squash, and stir well. Cook for 5 minutes or so more, allowing the edges to soften and pick up some colour.
  5. Now add everything else, stir well, and taste for seasoning. Allow to simmer, partially covered, on top of the stove for about 20-30 minutes, until the squash is soft and everything is thick and comes together.
  6. Before serving, taste and see if it needs more salt or heat. Stir in most of the cilantro, reserving a few leaves for garnish. Garnish with a sprinkling of cilantro, and slices of avocado, if you wish.

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Vegan Jerky

One of the common questions that vegans and vegetarians get a lot of the time is “where do you get your protein?”

It’s actually pretty surprising how easy it is to get plant-based sources of protein in your diet. Not all protein needs to be a big steak!

vegan jerky

For me, personally, peanut butter is something I eat pretty much every day, and cheese is a pretty big staple for me. I also eat quite a few legumes: beans, chickpeas and lentils (my freezer is still full of chickpeas from that time I wrote an Aquafaba cookbook). You might be surprised to learn quinoa is also packed with protein.

And then there’s tofu. Look–I’ve been pretty honest with you guys about how I feel about tofu. It’s not my favorite. I have a hard time infusing any flavor into it, no matter what I do to it. But I do still eat it some.

Tempeh is kind of like tofu’s cousin. Regular tofu is made from soybeans, but tempeh is made from fermented soy. Fermenting makes it easier to digest, if you have a tough time eating beans. Additionally, just one cup has 30 grams of protein! Not bad at all…

I recently ran into a new, local tempeh manufacturer here in Vancouver called Tempea. I discovered them at The Wellness Show, but you can run into them at Farmer’s Markets all over the Lower Mainland. I love to support local business, so the Tempea Tempeh is the basis of this recipe.

Now, let’s talk Jerky for a sec. Once thought to be the food of late-night 7-11 runs and hunters, the Paleo/Primal movement has caused a resurgence in jerky’s cool factor. When made with meat, jerky is basically cured and dried to the point where it won’t spoil. It becomes lighter, and very portable and packable. Full of protein, it makes a great snack to take a on hike or a longer trip where you won’t have access to purchase food. For the rest of us, it can make a great post-workout snack.

While traditional jerky is usually made with meat, you can make vegan jerky using tofu. This vegan, however, is made with tempeh. It’s pretty simple to do. You marinade the tempeh (cut in thin slices) overnight, then dehydrate them the next day. I used my dehydrator for this, but you could just as easily do it in your oven at very low temp.

Et voila! A light, portable, tasty, full-of-protein snack!

Tempeh Jerky

Vegan Jerky

Ingredients:

  • Tempeh (I used Tempea)
  • 2 tbsp soy sauce or wheat-free tamari
  • 1 tbsp apple cider vinegar
  • 6 drops liquid smoke
  • a couple dashes of hot sauce
  • 2 tbsp your favorite BBQ sauce
  • 2 tbsp maple syrup
  • 1/2 tsp granulated garlic
  • 1/2 tsp sesame oil

Method:

  1. Slice the tempeh thin and set aside.
  2. In a mason jar, combine all the marinade ingredients and shake well. Add the tempeh and make sure it is all well-coated in the marinade. You can add some water if you like to give it more volume. Place in the fridge overnight.
  3. The next day, remove the tempeh from the marinade and dry on paper towels.
  4. Place in a single layer in your dehydrator, and allow to dehydrate for about 2-2 1/2 hours on 225 degrees. If you don’t have a dehydrator, place in a single layer on a parchment-lined baking sheet. Bake at 200 degrees, for about 2-2 1/2 hours. Store in an air-tight container.

 

 

 

 

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