Tag Archive for beetbox

Vegan Yeasted Waffles

Oh the transformation!

I wasn’t able to post a new recipe last week because *drum roll please* my kitchen was getting a mini makeover!

It’s very exciting.

I got new countertops and also a new faucet, two things that badly needed doing. Next up, I’m buying a few new appliances (just the small ones) and I want to replace the hardware on the cabinet doors, as well as tile a backsplash.

I love how much brighter and cleaner my kitchen looks now!

kitchen

This Thursday, March 25, is International Waffle Day. Yes, I don’t know who comes up with these things, but you know what? I’m all in on waffles.

I’ve done overnight yeasted waffles before (not vegan), and I quite like them. You basically make the batter the night before and then set them in the fridge to do a slow rise overnight. In the morning, you make the waffles.

Most waffle recipes are leavened by a couple (or both) things: baking powder and/or egg whites. Whipping the egg whites (or you can use aquafaba if you’re doing a vegan version) and then folding them into the batter at the last moment creates a light, crispy waffle. Here, the dough is leavened with yeast. That means it takes more time to make because you have to wait for it rise, but the overnight version works pretty well.

This recipe comes from Chef Bryan Satterford at Beetbox. Beetbox is a local Vancouver platn-based comfort food eatery, and they serve my favourite vegan chicken. It’s just perfection.

A hand pouring maple syrup on a plate of chicken and waffles

They’re doing a special Chick-un and Waffles feature all this weekend to celebrate International Waffle Day, but the Chef kindly agreed to share with me his waffle recipe.

This is a solid waffle. It reminded me a lot of a liege waffle, the kind you buy on the street and munch in hand as you’re strolling. They certainly have that kind of strength. You need something substantial to stand up to chicken if you’re doing a chicken and waffles (even if it’s vegan). Nobody, and I say NOBODY wants a soggy waffle. The end.

So here’s the recipe to make the waffles yourself, or, if you’re feeling lazy, just head to Beetbox between March 25 and March 28 and get the chef to make you some.

a stack of waffles

Vegan Yeasted Waffles

By Beetbox Chef/Co-Owner Bryan Satterford

Yield: roughly one dozen 4-5 inch waffles

Ingredients:

  • 8 g Dried Yeast
  • 15 g Organic cane sugar
  • 275 ml Unsweetened pea protein milk (I used oat)
  • ½ Cinnamon stick
  • 2-3 Cardamom pods
  • 60 g Water
  • 20 ml Avocado oil (I used canola)
  • 15 ml Vanilla
  • 7 g Ground flax seed
  • 450 g AP flour
  • 4 g Kosher salt
  • 5 g Baking powder
  • 225 g Refined/de-scented coconut oil (broken into ½ inch pieces and hardened in the fridge)

Method:

  1. Heat the plant-based milk in a small saucepan with the spices until just below a simmer. Turn off the heat and allow milk to cool to 40C (roughly body temperature), remove the spices from the milk and add the yeast and allow to bloom.
  2. While the milk is cooling, gather the rest of your ingredients. Mix flax seed together with water, oil, and vanilla and allow the flax to thicken. Assemble the dry ingredients together in a mixer bowl.
  3. To assemble, dissolve flax mixture to the yeasted milk then add both to the mixing bowl with the flour, salt and baking powder. Mix with a dough hook on medium until a smooth dough has formed, about 3-5 minutes. Turn the mixer down to medium low and slowly start adding in the chilled coconut oil piece by piece. This process should take a few minutes — the idea is to emulsify the chilled oil into the dough. Once all the oil is fully emulsified, you should be left with a smooth, elastic dough.
  4. Allow dough to rise on the countertop until it doubles in size. (Alternatively, dough can be made ahead and allowed to rise in the fridge overnight). Punch down the dough and separate into 12 portions (roughly 75-80 g each).
  5. With an inverted cupped hand roll each portion into balls and allow to rise again until pillowy, roughly an hour. Cook on waffle iron according to manufacturers instructions and enjoy with maple syrup and whatever other topping you wish to add!

Vegan Chicken in Vancouver

When I look back over 2019 and the food trends of this past year, there are a couple that really stick out. Straws became persona non grata in Vancouver this year, and wow did Beyond Meat get popular! In the non-vegan world, it feels like Fried Chicken was the biggest food trend in VanCity this year. It all started with Juke a couple years back, but people went bonkers for the Down Low Chicken Shack and other fried chicken joints that seem to be popping up all over the city recently. 

In the veg world, there tends to be two different types of folks: one has zero interest in “fake meat” and the other is down with it, even if it’s just on an “every once in a while” basis. I mean, let’s face it, veggie or no, eating fried chicken (or fake fried chicken) every day isn’t good for you. 

But for vegetarians, it’s about having options. As a vegetarian, I have few choices at many convenience or fast food restaurants. My son loves to go to Jack in the Box whenever we’re in the States, and the veg choices there are almost nil, and the vegan choices are pretty much zero. 

Over the past year, many fast-food chains have gotten hip to the veg movement. It’s a win-win. The eatery gets more customers, and the customers are happy because they have more choices. 

A&W lead this charge this year by introducing the Beyond Burger (which they immediately sold out of, it was so popular), quickly followed by Tim Hortons and others. 

A&W is also at the front of the pack when it comes to vegan chicken, which I think is going to be the next big trend. 

I’m excited for it. I’m not the hugest fan of the Beyond Burger. I know it sounds weird, but it’s a little too much like meat for me. My thesis is that these “fake meat” products are actually more of an alternative for meat eaters than they are for vegetarians, but I’m all for it. In general, the less meat we eat the better. 

But vegan chicken! Yes please! Bring it. 

So, let’s talk about where you can get vegan chicken in Vancouver. 

KFC Vegetarian chicken

KFC. It’s probably been 10 years or so since I ate at Kentucky Fried Chicken, but when they rolled out a vegetarian chicken burger, I needed to check it out. The weird thing about this sandwich is that it’s basically a secret menu item of one. I can’t find it on the website, and when we went into the store, it wasn’t on the menu. I had to ask for it. Also, please note, it’s fried in the same frier as the chicken, so that may be enough to exclude some of you from trying it. Order it in a wrap, without mayo, and it’s vegan, or just order it regularly if you are vegetarian. 

A&W Plant based Chicken nuggets

A&W. As of the beginning of this month, A&W launched a plant-based chicken nugget. It comes with your choice of BBQ or Sweet & Sour sauces (pick BBQ, trust me). Again, I’m pretty sure they are fried in the same frier as the meat is, but it seems like that’s par for the course these days… 

BeetBox Vegan Chicken

BeetBox: Juke Fried Chicken opened up this little joint on Davie St, and it’s completely plant-based. The menu is exclusively comfort food; burgers, a Taco-Bell type gordita wrap, onion rings, fries… and yeah, they have salads, too. The salads look great, by the way, but I was there for the deep fried goodness. The Chick-Un Sandwich patty is made of seitan and soy, and comes with a miso-based dressing and lettuce. Also worthy to note this is the most expensive (though you are supporting a local biz, not a big chain) of the three options. 

Okay, so now I’m going to weigh in with my opinion. 

Of these three, (and it kind of shames me to say this) KFC is my fave. It’s the most authentic and chicken-like. It’s really quite shockingly delicious. I was frankly disappointed at the A&W nuggets. My feeling is, the Beyond Burger was such a big hit for them, they were rushing to get on the meatless train and roll out something different. But there’s nothing great about these nuggets. They remind me of the boring ones you can buy in the grocery store. They were pretty bland and boring, I don’t think I’d order them again. Beetbox was good, but the texture and colour of the burger reminded me more of a falafel than actual chicken. Also the dressing made the lettuce quite soggy, and I like the textural element of a crisp lettuce on my burger. 

Okay, over to you. Where have you had vegan chicken in Vancouver? Where am I missing and need to go? And have you tried any of the above vegan chicken? I’d love to hear your thoughts.