Archive for Author Rebecca Coleman

Rhubarb Syrup (and a cocktail recipe!)

Sweet, sweet spring. 

For me, the first sign of spring is rhubarb popping up at the Farmer’s Markets. I tend to overdose on it for a while, putting it in everything until I get sick (?) of it. 

I sometimes go back to old favourites. But I also like to try something new. 

This year, I made a Rhubarb Syrup. It’s simple to make, but I had misgivings when I started out. The rhubarb I had was quite green. It was ripe, it just had a lot of green colour in it, and not much pink. I wanted a syrup that was that delicate shade of pink, and I was afraid it wouldn’t work with the green rhubarb. 

A pink drink made with rhubarb syrup

But some kind of a weird miracle happened and the syrup turned out to be the most perfect and gorgeous shade. 

Rhubarb tends to be on the tart side, so you need to temper it with a bit of sugar, but the key is to create a balance. You don’t want to lose all the tartness of the rhubarb, you just want to take the edge off. You don’t want it to be too sweet. 

Basically, this experiment turned out pretty darn perfect. 

Once you’ve made the syrup, you have lots of ways to use it. 

Add a tablespoon or a bit more to the bottom of a glass, then add a handful of ice and top it off with sparking water or club soda. It’s refreshing, pink, and just a hint tart. 

Of course, if you want a more grownup version, you can add a shot of vodka or gin. 

You could also spoon this over vanilla ice cream (rhubarb and vanilla play very nicely together), or a panna cotta. You could even put it on pancakes or waffles! 

Rhubarb Syrup

Ingredients

  • 2 cups chopped rhubarb
  • 2 cups water
  • 1 cup sugar

Method: 

Rhubarb season is almost over. But if you have too much, here are some ideas to help you use it up. I also chop it and freeze it on a parchment-lined cookie sheet, and once it’s frozen, I store it in a zip top bag in the freezer so that I have rhubarb all year long. 

 

 

 

 

How to Make Oat Milk

Well, Oat Milk is sure having a moment right now. 

Increasingly, people are turning away from dairy, it feels like. Not so much maybe yogurt and cheese, but I feel like it’s less and less likely that grownups are sitting down to drink a big glass of milk. 

Pouring oat milk from a jug into a cup of coffee

And the amount of dairy alternatives available out there are growing daily. 

But here’s the thing: if you’re using non dairy milk for your coffee, you’re likely to be disappointed if you’re used to traditional cream. It’s thicker, fattier, it just makes your coffee look and taste better than any non-dairy alternative. 

Many non-dairy milks, in addition, are made with nuts, and a lot of people are allergic to nuts. They also can be really expensive. 

So! Enter oat milk. 

First off, it’s cheap like borscht. Oats will literally cost you pennies. You can buy big bags of it for a couple bucks at your local grocery, or I like to buy mine at the Bulk Barn. 

Secondly, it’s gluten free, nut free, pretty much everything else free… and oats are good for you. They contain a soluble fibre, which is thought to lower cholesterol. 

Thirdly, it makes a really creamy non-dairy milk. 

It’s also super easy to make. All you need is oats, water, and good blender. And a little time. 

Please watch my video: 

How to Make Oat Milk 

Ingredients: 

  • 1 part oats
  • 4 parts water
  • pinch of salt 
  • pinch of xanthan gum (optional–it makes your milk more homogenous so you don’t have to shake it before every use)

Variations:

  • dates
  • cinnamon
  • vanilla

Method: 

  1. Place the oats in a jar and cover with cool water. To make 2 cups of oat milk, use 1/4 cup oats and 2 cups cool water. Allow to sit overnight or at least 6 hours. 
  2. The next day, drain the oats and place them in the blender. Add 2 cups fresh cool water and the salt and the xanthan gum. Blend on high for at least 1-2 minutes. Drain the oat milk through a sieve, a cheesecloth or a nut milk bag. 

Variations:

  • For a sweetened oat milk, add 2 dates to the soaking oats. 
  • For cinnamon oat milk, add 1/4-1/2 tsp of cinnamon before blending
  • For vanilla oat milk, add 1/2-1 tsp vanilla before blending
  • To make coffee creamer, add less water on the final blend

NOTE: important to use cool/cold water, as warm/hot water will make your oat milk slimy! 

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