Aquafabulous!: 100+ Egg-Free Vegan Recipes Using Aquafaba (Bean Water)

After a year of hard work, my cookbook has been published!

Aquafabulous!

Yup, my cookbook, Aquafabulous!: 100+ Egg-Free Vegan Recipes Using Aquafaba is now in bookstores! You can also order it from Amazon.ca or Amazon.com and Chapters-Indigo.

The book has 125 recipes featuring Aquafaba, and here’s a little taste:

Kale Caesar Salad with Roasted Chickpeas

Kale Caesar with Roasted Chickpeas

Photography:Tango Photography
Food styling: Éric Régimbald
Prop styling: Véronique Gagnon-Lalanne

 Coconut French Toast

Vegan Coconut French Toast

Photography:Tango Photography
Food styling: Éric Régimbald
Prop styling: Véronique Gagnon-Lalanne

Sushi Salad

Vegan sushi salad

Photography:Tango Photography
Food styling: Éric Régimbald
Prop styling: Véronique Gagnon-Lalanne

Banoffee Pie in a Jar

Banoffee Pie in a jar

Photography:Tango Photography
Food styling: Éric Régimbald
Prop styling: Véronique Gagnon-Lalanne

Vegan Macarons

Vegan Macarons

Photography:Tango Photography
Food styling: Éric Régimbald
Prop styling: Véronique Gagnon-Lalanne

Aquafaba literally means bean water — the water that’s drained off neutral-colored beans like chickpeas, white beans and cannellini beans.

Vegans have had limited choices when it came to baked goods. The existing substitutes did not have the chemical properties of eggs which made them integral for binding and leavening. But now there is the perfect substitute, and it’s aquafaba. And it’s blown open the world of vegan baking.

This collection of recipes, however, is not only for vegans. It is great for anyone who has an allergy to dairy and eggs. It’s proof that you can go egg-free and still enjoy delicious recipes. You will never miss eggs again. The general rule of thumb is 3 tbsp of aquafaba equals one egg. The protein in aquafaba, when mixed with some sugar and a pinch of cream of tartar, perfectly simulates egg whites. Neutral in taste, you don’t have to worry about your dishes tasting beany.

All your breakfast and brunch favorites are here–from omelettes, French Toast and pancakes to scones and crepes. You’ll enjoy satisfying and sumptuous Vegan Shepherds Pie, Vegan Mac and Cheese or for lunch or dinner. And you can once again enjoy Alfredo Sauce over your pasta. And the meringue desserts are not to be missed — Fruit Pavlova and Sweet Potato Pie to Lemon Meringue Pie. Chocolate Chip Cookies, S’mores Bars, Snickerdoodles and Chocolate Ice Cream are perfect for those children’s birthday parties where allergies are now a prevailing concern.

Now you no longer have to live without the culinary wonders that eggs and egg whites produce. All you need to do is open up a can of chickpeas, drain the water and you’re ready to go.

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No Bake Peanut Butter Bars

Inspiration is a fickle beast. 

I’ve been writing this blog for so long, I don’t actually know how long it’s been, but I’m guessing it’s a decade or so. 

Certainly my participation has waxed and waned. There have been times when I generated 5 blog posts per week (and it nearly killed me), and there have been plenty of times where I took a break and generated nothing at all! 

After doing this for so long, sometimes I feel really stretched for content ideas. Not that, in the world of food, there is ever any lack of subject matter. There’s always another recipe to make. 

No Bake Peanut Butter Bars

The inspiration for this recipe came from salt. I know! It sounds weird… but I got a bag of flavoured salt for Christmas from my friend Vicki and immediately my mind started working out what I could do with it. If it was savoury salt, I would have just thrown it into pasta or whatever, but it’s a salted caramel salt from Vancouver Island, and I knew it needed to go into a dessert. 

I also had a few bits and bobs of things around, but not really enough for a full recipe of one thing, so I combined a few things and voila! Delicious success. 

This is a no-bake bar, perfect for when you’re feeling a bit lazy. It’s also easy to do a vegan or gluten free version of this recipe (or even a vegan gluten free version!). 

It’s a riff on a recipe that has been on of my favourites and that I’ve been making for years, just juzzed up a bit. They kinda taste like a Resses Peanut Butter Cup, but with a crunchier texture. Enjoy. 

Vegan Gluten Free No Bake Peanut Butter Bars

No Bake Peanut Butter Bars

Ingredients

  • 1/2 cup butter (vegan butter alternate)
  • 3/4 cup peanut butter 
  • 1 cup graham cracker crumbs (alternate: vegan gluten free graham crackers, I use Kinnikinnick S’moreables Gluten Free Graham Crackers)
  • 1/2 cup corn flakes 
  • 1/2 cup brown sugar 
  • 1 tsp vanilla
  • 1 cup chocolate (dark vegan chocolate or non vegan chocolate chips)
  • milk (non dairy vegan alternative)
  • finishing salt

Method: 

  1. In a small pot over medium heat, place the butter, and melt it. Then add in the peanut butter and the sugar and stir everything well until it’s all melted together. 
  2. In a large bowl, place your graham cracker crumbs and corn flakes. 
  3. Remove the butter/peanut butter/sugar mixture from the heat and stir in the vanilla.
  4. Pour the entire contents over the graham crackers and corn flakes. Stir well to combine. 
  5. Press the mixture into an 8″x8″ pan, then place in the refrigerator for at least an hour to set. 
  6. Melt the chocolate over a double boiler. Once the chocolate is melted, add a little milk, a few tablespoons at a time, until it gets to a pourable consistency. (this is the tricky part–I can’t give you real measurements here, you have to kinda wing it). Pour the chocolate over the peanut butter base and sprinkle the whole thing with a pinch or two of finishing salt. Place in the fridge to set. 
  7. Cut into 12-16 squares. 
  8. This bar tastes great frozen. Store in the freezer and pull one out 5 minutes before eating. 

Risotto Milanese {Vegan option}

Winter has landed in Vancouver. As I type this, snowflakes are falling outside my window, and the city has come to a standstill. It’s a snow day in Vancouver, the schools are all closed (including BCIT), and many businesses will not bother to open today. 

I’m grateful I stocked up on soup and snacks and veg yesterday before all this madness happened, as I will not be going anywhere today on my very bald tires. 

I will be snuggling in bed with the cat and thinking warm thoughts and drinking lots of tea. 

With this cold snap, I’m craving simple comfort foods…Cacio e Pepe, a super simple pasta dish made with simply pepper and cheese, for example, I can’t seem to get enough of. Risotto Milanese Vegan

And risotto in a warm, sunny colour. I make risotto a lot, it’s filling and comforting, and is a basic pantry staple, as there’s never a time when I don’t have arborio, stock, wine, onions, garlic and cheese. 

The twist on this particular risotto is that it’s made with saffron. I went through a bit of a Persian cooking obsession last year when I discovered Bottom of the Pot. Saffron is a staple of Persian cooking, but you may not know it’s also one of the most expensive spices in the world. Saffron

You see, each thread of saffron is the pistil of a crocus, and needs to be harvested carefully by hand. A lot of work goes into making saffron, so its end cost is pricey. Thankfully, I live in a town with a big Persian and middle-eastern population, so finding it at a reasonable price is pretty easy to do. 

I thought I’d make something with my saffron supply, and decided risotto milanese was the way to go. It’s a simple twist on risotto that produces a beautiful, warm, yellow-coloured dish that will warm you up from the inside. 

I topped mine with some mushrooms I fried up in olive oil, garlic and rosemary. Yay dinner! Risotto Milanese

Risotto Milanese 

  • 2 tbsp olive oil
  • 2 tbsp vegan butter
  • 1/2 onion, diced
  • 3 cloves garlic, diced
  • 3/4 cup aborio rice
  • 2 tbsp white wine
  • 4-6 cups vegetable stock
  • a large pinch of saffron threads 
  • freshly grated parmesan cheese (optional, or vegan parm)
  • salt and pepper to taste

Method: 

  1. In a saucepan, heat the vegetable stock to boiling. Once it’s come to a boil, reduce the heat to a simmer. 
  2. Meanwhile, in a large pot over medium heat, heat the olive oil and 1 tbsp of butter. Add the onions and a generous pinch of salt, stir to coat in the oil, and allow to cook until translucent. You may want to reduce the heat a little if you see the edges  of the onions picking up some caramelization. Once the onions are softened, add the garlic and stir until fragrant. 
  3. Add the rice and stir everything together until the rice is coated in the oil and onions and garlic. Deglaze the pan with the wine. Add in the pinch of saffron. 
  4. Add a ladle or two of stock to the pan, and allow it to come to a boil. Stir the risotto fairly continuously, adding another ladle of stock as needed. Continue doing this until the rice is cooked and the risotto looks saucy. You’ll need to keep tasting it to check for the doneness of the rice. 
  5. Add the final pat of vegan butter, and the cheese if you’re using it, stir well, and remove from the heat. Test for seasoning and add more salt if needed. Place a lid on and let it sit for a few minutes before serving. 
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