Aquafabulous!: 100+ Egg-Free Vegan Recipes Using Aquafaba (Bean Water)

After a year of hard work, my cookbook has been published!

Aquafabulous!

Yup, my cookbook, Aquafabulous!: 100+ Egg-Free Vegan Recipes Using Aquafaba is now in bookstores! You can also order it from Amazon.ca or Amazon.com and Chapters-Indigo.

The book has 125 recipes featuring Aquafaba, and here’s a little taste:

Kale Caesar Salad with Roasted Chickpeas

Kale Caesar with Roasted Chickpeas

Photography:Tango Photography
Food styling: Éric Régimbald
Prop styling: Véronique Gagnon-Lalanne

 Coconut French Toast

Vegan Coconut French Toast

Photography:Tango Photography
Food styling: Éric Régimbald
Prop styling: Véronique Gagnon-Lalanne

Sushi Salad

Vegan sushi salad

Photography:Tango Photography
Food styling: Éric Régimbald
Prop styling: Véronique Gagnon-Lalanne

Banoffee Pie in a Jar

Banoffee Pie in a jar

Photography:Tango Photography
Food styling: Éric Régimbald
Prop styling: Véronique Gagnon-Lalanne

Vegan Macarons

Vegan Macarons

Photography:Tango Photography
Food styling: Éric Régimbald
Prop styling: Véronique Gagnon-Lalanne

Aquafaba literally means bean water — the water that’s drained off neutral-colored beans like chickpeas, white beans and cannellini beans.

Vegans have had limited choices when it came to baked goods. The existing substitutes did not have the chemical properties of eggs which made them integral for binding and leavening. But now there is the perfect substitute, and it’s aquafaba. And it’s blown open the world of vegan baking.

This collection of recipes, however, is not only for vegans. It is great for anyone who has an allergy to dairy and eggs. It’s proof that you can go egg-free and still enjoy delicious recipes. You will never miss eggs again. The general rule of thumb is 3 tbsp of aquafaba equals one egg. The protein in aquafaba, when mixed with some sugar and a pinch of cream of tartar, perfectly simulates egg whites. Neutral in taste, you don’t have to worry about your dishes tasting beany.

All your breakfast and brunch favorites are here–from omelettes, French Toast and pancakes to scones and crepes. You’ll enjoy satisfying and sumptuous Vegan Shepherds Pie, Vegan Mac and Cheese or for lunch or dinner. And you can once again enjoy Alfredo Sauce over your pasta. And the meringue desserts are not to be missed — Fruit Pavlova and Sweet Potato Pie to Lemon Meringue Pie. Chocolate Chip Cookies, S’mores Bars, Snickerdoodles and Chocolate Ice Cream are perfect for those children’s birthday parties where allergies are now a prevailing concern.

Now you no longer have to live without the culinary wonders that eggs and egg whites produce. All you need to do is open up a can of chickpeas, drain the water and you’re ready to go.

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Unruly Sour Cocktails at Forage

I am lucky enough to live in Vancouver’s West End. It’s tough living in the city these days. It’s becoming more and more unaffordable by the moment. I’ll be here as long as I can… I love living in the heart of the city and being able to easily walk or ride my bike to most places. It’s part of living a sustainable lifestyle.

Unruly Sour Forage Vancouver

Forage, who is celebrating their fifth anniversary this month, is one of my favourite restaurants in the neighbourhood, and, in fact, in the city. I love them for a lot of different reasons; first off, they have a fantastic chef. Chris Whittaker is one of the best and most creative chefs in the city. Secondly, they are committed to a local, sustainable, seasonal menu, which I love. Finally, the people are really amazing. There are many staff here that have been at Forage from the beginning. Many restaurants have a high turnover of staff, Forage, you’ll find, does not. I think it must be a pretty great place to work.

I’ve had some amazing meals here; too many favourite dishes to list.

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Their drinks menu is also focused on local business; all the wine, beer and spirits here are locally sourced.

On a recent visit, J.D, the bartender, taught me how to make their most popular cocktail; The Unruly Sour. It’s so named because of the local gin that is the main spirit in the cocktail (sourced from Wayward Distilling on the Island).

I also learned that I’ve been making sours wrong all this time! I’m a huge fan of the sour; if there’s a Bourbon Sour on a menu, I will order it, and I make them at home as well (using aquafaba, of course). It turns out that to make the drink properly, you have to do what’s called a “dry shake” first, where you mix the spirit, the egg whites, the lemon/lime and the syrup together without ice. You then add ice and shake again. This creates a smoother cocktail.

Here’s J.D showing you how to make your own (or you could just drop by Forage at 1300 Robson and get him to make one for you).

Coconut Milk Substitutes

A couple weeks back, I was craving a vegan dessert that used coconut milk as its base. Now, normally, I keep a can of coconut milk in my cupboard at all times. It’s easy enough to do–shelf-stable, and good for so many applications–both savoury and sweet.

But for some reason that day, my cupboard was coconut-milk free! I had used up my last can and not replaced it.

Coconut Milk Substitutes

So I started thinking about substitutions. What could I substitute for that can of coconut milk?

There are surprisingly quite a few options. I tried them all out, and here’s what I found:

  1. Make your own coconut milk. Click here to learn how.
  2. Use a powdered coconut milk. I bought mine at the Bulk Barn, but there are several large manufacturers who also sell it in grocery stores. I’ve seen Grace Brand, for example, in my local Loblaws. Basically, you use a couple tablespoons of the powder and stir it into water or another non-dairy milk.
  3. Pure Creamed Coconut. This little pouch contains the milk, solids and fat from the coconut, so it gives you a more balanced coconut milk. Again, you just add a few tablespoons to water to create your coconut milk. It’s available in grocery stores beside the canned coconut milk.

 

I tried all 3 coconut milks, and examined them both for texture (thickness, creaminess, etc) and taste against canned coconut milk, and of the 3, the Pure Creamed Coconut was my favorite.

While I like the idea of making my own coconut milk, it does leave behind a lot of solids, and unless you use those solids in some cookies or energy balls, that means waste.

The coconut milk powder that I bought required me to mix it in with a non-dairy milk. I didn’t like this idea for two reasons: first off, you have to have non dairy milk on hand, and you may not. Secondly, the coconut milk just tasted like cashew milk (which was the base milk I mixed it into). What I have to experiment with is mixing the coconut milk powder into water and seeing how that turns out.

The Pure Creamed Coconut was my fave and the most like canned coconut milk of the three. However, there were a few small solids in there, so just be aware that it may not be as smooth and creamy as your regular canned coconut milk.

One last tip: if you are using pure creamed coconut, it helps to soak the unopened pouch in a bowl of hot water for 5 minutes or so before you use it to soften it up.

Have you used coconut milk substitutes? What’s your favorite? Let me know in the comments below.

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