Salted Dark Chocolate Shortbread

A few years back, when I first started my business, I’d bake mountains of Christmas cookies to distribute to my clients this time of the year. 

Well, times have changed. My teaching career took off, I entered the lucrative world of food blogging (LOL) and I slowly let my clients go. I mostly work with one major client these days. 

But I still really like baking cookies at this time of the year. Heck, at any time of the year, if we’re being honest. I’m kind of a snob about making sure Michael has homemade cookies in his lunch. And I don’t like visiting friends this time of the year empty-handed. And I do have cookie exchange this weekend… Salted Dark Chocolate Shortbread

So this year, I’m making three types of cookies. These ginger cookies are one of my faves this time of the year. I kick them up with a grating of fresh ginger and some chopped candied ginger. I’m also going to be making my vegan snickerdoodles (recipe is in my cookbook) for the vegans in the crowd, and then I made these. 

Now, to be fair, these were a very spur-of-the-moment decision. They were a bit of a risk. 

A couple weeks back, my friend Rob came into town to go to the Christmas Market with Michael and I. The next morning, after Michael had gone to school, Rob and I walked over to the downtown Lindt store before he caught the ferry back to the Sunshine Coast. I got Michael an advent calendar, and I stocked up on my favourite chocolate bar, which is the Lindt Dark Fleur de Sel. I am basically never without one of these in my house. I don’t eat a lot of them, maybe one square or two per night, but I like to have it on hand at all times. 

As we were leaving, I grabbed a Lindt-produced magazine to have a look at, as it had recipes, and I noticed this one for a chocolate shortbread. I figured I’d give it a go. 

I made the cookies and they were good. So good, in fact, that all the taste-testers concerned agreed they were blog-worthy. And I think these will now make it into my regular rotation. 

They’re super easy to make because you just make up the dough, then roll it into a log and then allow it to set up in the fridge. When you’re ready to bake them, just slice off rounds. It also freezes well, or you could gift people with logs of uncooked dough which they could bake themselves. 

By the way, this post is, in no way, shape or form sponsored by Lindt. But Lindt, if you’re reading… 😉 

Dark Chocolate Shortbread

Salted Dark Chocolate Shortbread

Ingredients

  • 1 ½ cups butter, softened to room temp
  • 1 ½ icing sugar
  • 3 cups flour
  • ½ tsp sea salt
  • 1 bar Sea Salt Dark Chocolate (or dark chocolate plus a little extra sea salt)

Method

  1. In the bowl of your stand mixer, cream together the butter and sugar until fluffy. 
  2. Add the salt and then the flour slowly (so as not to create an poof of flour), until it is incorporated. 
  3. Chop the chocolate bar into small pieces, and fold the chocolate into the dough. 
  4. Divide the dough into three even lumps, and then roll the lumps out into logs about 2″ in diameter. Wrap the logs snugly in wax paper or saran wrap, then place in the fridge to set. 
  5. Preheat oven to 350 degrees. 
  6. Slice the logs into 1/4″ to 1/2″ slices, and place on a cookie sheet. Sprinkle with a little extra grated chocolate and sea salt if desired. 
  7. Bake for around 9 minutes, until the edges are just beginning to be golden. 
  8. Remove and allow to cool on a wire rack. 

Canadian Christmas Cocktail

Yup, the Christmas posts have begun. 

Does this make me behind the times? It is, after all, nearly the middle of December. 

My tree’s not up, and I’ve only baked one batch of Christmas cookies so far. It’s possible I’m behind, but I’m honestly not that bothered by it. 

Canadian Christmas Cocktail.

Truth is, there are too many other things going on right now. Christmas is going to have to take care of itself. I’m buried in marking, I’m writing press releases like there’s no tomorrow, and scheduling social content for 5 different channels. It’s nutty, kids. 

But that’s okay. All of this frenetic energy is going to come to crashing stop when I get on a plane at the end of the week to go somewhere where it’s not raining 24/7. Where it’s warm and sunny. 

The problem is, to get to that point, so that I don’t have to worry or work while I’m away, is an immense amount of work. 

It’s all gonna be worth it, though! 

So let’s have a cocktail, shall we? 

I recently started working with Maple Water. Now, you might be wondering (as I was), what the heck is maple water??? Well, my friends, it just might be the most Canadian thing, um… ever. 

Basically, when they tap the maple trees in the spring, they are collecting the sap inside the trees. That is maple water. Once they have enough of it, they boil it down and make it in the syrup you know and love on your pancakes. It takes 40 litres of maple water to make one litre of syrup. 

But in the meantime, some smarty-pants discovered that this stuff tastes good, and when they had it analyzed, it turns out it contains electrolytes, amino acids, and ABA, a plant hormone that may help to balance blood sugar levels. Basically, if you have been a fan of coconut water, you’re going to love this stuff. If you have not been a fan of coconut water (ie, me), you’re going to love this stuff. 

So what can you do with it? It’s great for making coffee (c’mon, now, coffee and maple??!), you can put it in your smoothie, I’ve been using it to make overnight oats. And… cocktails! 

For me, this stuff pretty neatly takes the place of a simple syrup. It’s not a sweet, and it has a touch of acidity. I’ve been liking experimenting with it a lot. 

Canadian Christmas Cocktail

Ingredients

  • 1.5 oz vodka
  • 1 oz maple water (I’m using Pure Maple Water)
  • .5 oz pomegranate juice
  • splash of grenadine
  • twist of orange

Cheers! 

 

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