Archive for Vegan

Zucchini Fritters {Vegan, Gluten-Free}

Three years ago when I was writing my cookbook, I discovered the joys of chickpea flour. 

My cookbook, as you probably already know, is dedicated to Aquafaba, that weird goop that you drain off of a can of beans that acts as an astonishing egg white substitute. 

As it turns out, the mighty, mighty chickpea has more tricks up its sleeve. 

Chickpea flour, or besan, is made from dried and ground up chickpeas, and boy, is it great! If you enjoy South Asian cooking and you’ve ever had a pakora, you’ll know what I’m talking about. vegan gluten free zucchini fritters

Chickpea flour is also a key ingredient in making Socca, a kind of gluten-free flatbread that’s quite tasty and is served in a few different cultures’ offerings, including Spain. 

There’s a recipe in my book for a vegan version of a latke. Despite having a pretty Jewish-sounding last name, I am not Jewish, but I do really enjoy Jewish foods. Whenever I make latkes (usually around Hanukkah, because why not?), Michael always does the happy dance. 

This recipe is a vegan, gluten-free version of a latke, only using zucchini as the base, rather than potatoes, carrots, and/or sweet potatoes, which make a slightly starchier version. 

It’s the time of the year when most people are overflowing with zucchini, and this is a great way to use up your zucchini bounty. 

I was reminded of this recipe recently when I was visiting my friend Peggy on Gabriola. This version is simpler than my cookbook version, basically just 3 ingredients: zucchini, chickpea flour and water. But it makes the most perfect fritter: the zucchini goes all lovely and creamy on the inside, while the outside is crispy and textured. 

You can season this up any way you like. Salt and pepper, obviously. I like a little onion in mine. Other than that; whatever turns you on. Indian spices like cumin or cardamom would be great, or you can go Eastern European with a dash of smoked paprika. Za’atar?? That would rock these. Play around and see what makes your tastebuds sing. Zucchini Fritters Vegan Gluten Free

Zucchini Fritters {Vegan, Gluten-Free}

Ingredients

  • 1 medium large zucchini
  • 2-4 tbsp chickpea flour
  • 2-3 tbsp water
  • salt and pepper
  • oil for frying 

Method

How to Make Oat Milk

Well, Oat Milk is sure having a moment right now. 

Increasingly, people are turning away from dairy, it feels like. Not so much maybe yogurt and cheese, but I feel like it’s less and less likely that grownups are sitting down to drink a big glass of milk. 

Pouring oat milk from a jug into a cup of coffee

And the amount of dairy alternatives available out there are growing daily. 

But here’s the thing: if you’re using non dairy milk for your coffee, you’re likely to be disappointed if you’re used to traditional cream. It’s thicker, fattier, it just makes your coffee look and taste better than any non-dairy alternative. 

Many non-dairy milks, in addition, are made with nuts, and a lot of people are allergic to nuts. They also can be really expensive. 

So! Enter oat milk. 

First off, it’s cheap like borscht. Oats will literally cost you pennies. You can buy big bags of it for a couple bucks at your local grocery, or I like to buy mine at the Bulk Barn. 

Secondly, it’s gluten free, nut free, pretty much everything else free… and oats are good for you. They contain a soluble fibre, which is thought to lower cholesterol. 

Thirdly, it makes a really creamy non-dairy milk. 

It’s also super easy to make. All you need is oats, water, and good blender. And a little time. 

Please watch my video: 

How to Make Oat Milk 

Ingredients: 

  • 1 part oats
  • 4 parts water
  • pinch of salt 
  • pinch of xanthan gum (optional–it makes your milk more homogenous so you don’t have to shake it before every use)

Variations:

  • dates
  • cinnamon
  • vanilla

Method: 

  1. Place the oats in a jar and cover with cool water. To make 2 cups of oat milk, use 1/4 cup oats and 2 cups cool water. Allow to sit overnight or at least 6 hours. 
  2. The next day, drain the oats and place them in the blender. Add 2 cups fresh cool water and the salt and the xanthan gum. Blend on high for at least 1-2 minutes. Drain the oat milk through a sieve, a cheesecloth or a nut milk bag. 

Variations:

  • For a sweetened oat milk, add 2 dates to the soaking oats. 
  • For cinnamon oat milk, add 1/4-1/2 tsp of cinnamon before blending
  • For vanilla oat milk, add 1/2-1 tsp vanilla before blending
  • To make coffee creamer, add less water on the final blend

NOTE: important to use cool/cold water, as warm/hot water will make your oat milk slimy! 

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