Tag Archive for easy vegan recipes

Healthyish Chocolate Chip Cookies {Vegan}

So, before we even get started right now, let me air a grievance.

It drives me bonkers when I’m on Pinterest and pin after pin after pin is “Healthy Snickers Bars!” Healthy and clean have become buzzwords that–okay–what do they really mean???

Here’s the thing: if something is loaded with fat or sugar or white flour, even if you brand it as vegan or gluten free, that doesn’t make it healthy.

Healthyish Chocolate Chip Cookies

So this recipe? Healthyish.

Healthyish because: 

✅ Contains sprouted spelt flour. Sprouted flours are better for us than regular flour because they make the nutrients more available for us to absorb. Spelt is an ancient grain, a whole grain, and has high fibre and lots of protein.

✅ Contains low refined sugars. One of the things I like the best about this recipe is that it uses coconut sugar (which is much lower on the GI index than regular sugar and maple syrup to sweeten.

✅ Contains coconut oil. Coconut oil is a decent substitute when it comes to oils. It’s a better choice than, say, canola.

What I love about these chocolate chip cookies, though, is how tasty they are. The sprouted spelt flour keeps them soft and the dark chocolate rocks.

Sprouted Spelt Chocolate Chip Cookies

Healthyish Chocolate Chip Cookies {Vegan}

(adapted from One Degree Organics)

Ingredients

1 1/3 cup sprouted spelt flour (I get mine a Bulk Barn)
1/4 cup coconut palm sugar
1/2 tsp baking powder
1/4 tsp salt
1/3 cup plus 2 Tbsp maple syrup
1 1/2 tsp vanilla
1/4 cup plus 3 Tbsp melted coconut oil
1/2 cup vegan chocolate chips

Vegan Chocolate Chip Cookies

Method

  1. In a medium bowl, mix all the dry ingredients together (except the chocolate chips).
  2. In a separate bowl, mix the wet ingredients together.
  3. Pour the wet into the dry and mix, adding in the chocolate chips.
  4. Drop by spoonfuls (I use my cookie scoop) onto cookie sheets, and bake for about 9-12 minutes in a pre-heated 375 degree oven.
  5. Remove from oven and allow to cool slightly before removing to a wire rack.

Cookbook Review: Vegan Meal Prep

Meal prep is having a hot moment. I’m guessing it all started way back with the mason jar salad, but it’s only continued to grow in popularity, especially with those loving the Keto or Paleo diets. 

I am, personally, a big fan. The reality of my life is that, like many of you, I’m busy. I work, I have a kid and I attempt to have a social life. That doesn’t always leave time for cooking elaborate meals, so I tend to focus on dinners, especially, that come together in under 30 minutes: stir fries, pastas, tacos, veggie burgers.

The other reality of my life is that, if I don’t pre-plan, I often don’t eat at all, or I don’t eat healthy. I’ve been known to survive on peanut butter sandwiches, or Tim Horton’s bagels. So planning a week’s worth of meals in advance seems like a smart thing to do. 

What I dislike about most meal prep plans is the lack of variety. You make a bunch of stuff at the beginning of the week, and then you eat that same thing all week. As a girl who gets bored easily, this can be a challenge. I look at that salad I’ve been eating all week on Thursday, and suddenly a peanut butter sandwich is looking good. So, I appreciate the time meal prepping saves me, and I appreciate that it means I eat healthier, but I hate being bored.

I recently got a copy of Robin Asbell’s Vegan Meal Prep cookbook, published by Robert Rose

The first thing I love about this cookbook is that it has 5 weeks of meal prep plans, and not one meal is the same during the week. Boredom problem: solved! 

The meal preps are laid out: every meal you’ll eat for the week, as well as a comprehensive shopping list, and a list of tasks to do on prep day. 

One thing to love about this cookbook is that it’s for real eaters. They might be vegan, but this is not delicate diet food. You won’t been eating a plate of leaves and twigs. The recipes are hearty; stews, soups, pastas, handfuls of sandwiches. You will not be going hungry on this meal prep plan. 

I also love how Asbell incorporates savoury ingredients into places you’d not expect them. Sweet potato, for example, is a heavy hitter in this book, and I’m really okay with it! They show up in breakfasts, desserts, and of course in the regular ways, too. Quinoa also plays a starring role in many sweet as well as savoury dishes. What I’m saying is, Asbell is creative, and doesn’t rely on tofu as the main ingredient. 

I made quite a few recipes from this book: Sweet Potato Chickpea Cakes, Matcha-Glazed Pistachio Blondies, Blueberry Breakfast Squares, and Korean Mock Duck Lettuce Wraps

Sweet Potato Chickpea Cakes

Sweet Potato Chickpea Cakes: reminded me a lot of a fritter or a falafel, only made with sweet potatoes. Now, again, I’m a big fan of the yam, so I have no problems with this! I ate this all week on the side of a salad, and enjoyed them. I’d make these again. 

Matcha Glazed Pistachio Blondies

Matcha-Glaze Pistachio Blondies: I have a bit of an issue with the name. To me, a blondie needs to include having the fat (usually butter, but we’re being vegan here) melted down on top of the stove with sugar. So I don’t know if I’d technically call this a blondie, but whatever you wanna call it, I really liked the recipe. It was quite tasty, and the matcha glaze gave it a nice punch at the end. 

Blueberry Breakfast Squares: for some reason, in my head, I expected these to be more of an oaty granola-bar texture, but it tasted more like a banana bread with blueberries. 

Korean Mock Duck Lettuce Wraps

Korean Mock Duck Lettuce Wraps: let me just say, before reading this cookbook, I’d never heard of mock duck. I live in Vancouver, we have a huge Asian population and tons of Asian supermarkets, but this one got by me. I found it in a can at my local Asian supermarket, and it is basically seitan, but it’s been marinated and cooked in such a way to resemble duck. I enjoyed this recipe, though it was the most expensive of all the ones I tested. One thing to watch out for with this recipe is that store-bought kimchi may not be vegan. They often add fish sauce or the like to add to that salty, funky flavour. You may want to make your own

So, wanna eat better? More healthy? Save time? Then, yes! Vegan Meal Prep is for you! 

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