Tag Archive for ice cream

The Easiest, Most Delicious Ice Cream Ever

I’ve been saving this recipe to share with you as the weather gets warmer, and boy howdy did that happen this week!

We had some record-breaking temperatures–it hit 30 degrees–in April!

It’s officially ice cream weather.

the easiest most delicious ice cream you've ever made--just 3 ingredients!

A few months back, I went for a routine blood test, and my doctor reported that my cholesterol was higher than it should be, and recommended I cut back on egg yolks, full-fat cheese and butter (insert sad faces).

Now, traditional ice cream recipes call for egg yolks to thicken the custard, something I’d always kinda found a pain in the butt, because it left me with leftover egg whites, which meant I had to source out recipes that used egg whites and make those (macaroons, how can you not like those?). Plus, with traditional ice cream recipes (custard-based), you have to cook them, and then cool them down. It’s a process that takes hours, and what if I want ice cream right now?

I also wanted to avoid using whipping cream, which is another essential ingredient in ice cream. It’s not something I usually have in the house, and full of saturated fat, something I was supposed to be avoiding.

I sometimes substitute condensed milk for whipping cream, so I started googling around to see if I could find a recipe that included condensed milk, and eureka! This one surfaced.

Now, you might feel a bit squicked out by the xanthan gum. What is it? What is it made out of? What does it do? Xanthan is a food additive made from fermented glucose. Sounds weird, right? But it’s pretty natural, and it makes the texture of this ice cream perfection. Honestly, even with traditional custard-based ice creams, I’d find that they would get too hard after being in the freezer for a  while. This stuff keeps it exactly the right consistency all the time. I buy mine at the Gourmet Warehouse.

Now! On to the the easiest and most delicious ice cream everrrrrr!!!

3-ingredient ice cream

The Easiest and Most Delicious Ice Cream Ever

(adapted from Eugenie Kitchen)

Ingredients:

  • 1 can of evaporated milk (NOT sweetened condensed milk)
  • 1/2 cup of sugar
  • 1/2 a vanilla bean or 1 tsp vanilla bean paste
  • 1/8 tsp xanthan gum
  • 4 oreos (I have also used Trader Joe’s mini peanut butter cups as well)

Method:

  1. Open the can of milk and dump it into a bowl. Add the sugar and whisk.
  2. Split open the vanilla pod with the tip of a sharp paring knife and scrape the inside seeds into your ice cream mixture (or you can just use a tsp of vanilla bean paste).
  3. Add the Xanthan gum and whisk well to combine.
  4. Turn on your ice cream maker and pour the ice cream base into the churn. Churn for about 20 minutes, then crush the oreos and add them to the base. Churn for about 5 minutes more, then scrape the ice cream out of the bowl and into a container. Allow to set up in the freezer for about an hour, and then serve.
  5. If you don’t have an ice cream maker, refer to Eugenie’s method here.

 

Strawberry Kefir Ice Cream

One thing I love about being a blogger is that sometimes a series of events come together to create the perfect dish; and the byproduct of that is, of course, a blog post.

1. Last week was a very busy one for me, I had a bunch of blog-related events to go to, one of which was a trip to an Organic Dairy Farm in Abbotsford. It was a perfect day for it–warm and sunny–and we got to bottle-feed baby cows, and learn the inner workings of how milk gets from the cow to our refrigerators. The nice folks at Olympic Dairy sent us home with a cooler full of yogourt, and included in the cooler was a big jug of Strawberry Kefir.

Baby cow noses count as one of the cutest things in the world.

Baby cow noses count as one of the cutest things in the world.

2. It’s now strawberry season here in Vancouver. You can find strawberries in the Farmer’s Markets, and some of the grocery stores here in the Lower Mainland. I always love this time of the year. The annual arrival of strawberries, asparagus, and garlic scapes, to me, always symbolizes the beginning of summer.

3. I had a conversation online the other day with Harriet and Emily about making Kefir (in reference to my last post). In that conversation, Emily mentioned that she liked making Kefir into ice cream.

1 + 2 + 3 = Strawberry Kefir Ice Cream! 

You might remember a recipe I posted about this time last year, that showed you how to make Strawberry Frozen Yogurt. This is a very similar concept; there’s no eggs to thicken this “ice cream.” There is, in fact, no actual cream in it, either. It has that slightly tangy flavour from the kefir, but that makes it, as far as I’m concerned, even more refreshing. Things that are too sweet feel heavy to me.

Additionally, you get the probiotic benefits of kefir. Freezing it for a long period of time will abate some of the positive effects of the good bacteria, but it won’t last that long. Trust me.

strawberry kefir ice creamStrawberry Kefir Ice Cream

Ingredients:

  • blender
  • ice cream maker
  • 1/2 cup fresh strawberries
  • 1 cup strawberry kefir (I’m using Olympic Dairy Organic Kefir)
  • 1/2 cup regular kefir (I used the stuff I made last week)
  • 1/3 cup sugar
  • 1/2 tsp vanilla

Method:

  1. Wash and hull the strawberries, and quarter them, or even cut them into eighths, if they are really big ones. Drop them into your blender with about 2 tbsp of the strawberry kefir. Puree until smooth. Add the sugar and blend again.
  2. Add the additional kefir (both kinds) and blend until smooth. Finally, stir in the vanilla. Taste, and make sure it’s sweet enough; you may want to add more strawberry puree or sugar if it’s too tart.
  3. Freeze the ice cream according to your ice cream maker manufacturer’s directions. I have a Cuisinart Frozen Yogurt, Ice Cream and Sorbet Maker, and it took about 15 minutes to achieve the correct consistency.
  4. Scoop out of your ice cream maker, and place into a plastic container, and place in the freezer to allow to freeze until it’s hard (at least a couple of hours).

 

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